Can comprehensive specialised end-of-life care be provided at home? Lessons from a study of an innovative consultant-led community service in the UK

September 9, 2014

Source: European Journal of Cancer Care 2014 doi: 10.1111/ecc.12195

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Date of publication: April 2014 (online ahead of print)

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell: The Midhurst Macmillan Specialist Palliative Care Service (MMSPCS) is a UK, medical consultant-led, multidisciplinary team aiming to provide round-the-clock advice and care, including specialist interventions, in the home, community hospitals and care homes. The authors present a study of the Midhurst Macmillan Specialist Palliative Care Service, which provides specialised hands-on palliative care in a community setting in an area of South-East England, UK. This service is distinct in that it is medical consultant-led and aims to deliver interventions in the home setting that are usually considered to require hospital admission. Patients and carers reported positive experiences of support, linked to the flexible way the service worked.

Length of publication: 14p.

 

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Future needs and preferences for hospice care: challenges and opportunities for hospices

May 22, 2013

Source: Help the Hospices Commission

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Date of publication:April 2013

Publication type: Report

In a nutshell: This report considers how hospices need to develop over the next three to five years to be prepared for the challenges facing them in the future, challenges including building new partnerships and developing stronger business acumen to working more closely with care home and doing more to value carers.

Length of publication: 57p


New ‘Hospice at Home’ service will give more choice to patients coming to the end of their lives

July 23, 2012

Source: Norfolk Community and Health Care NHS Trust

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Date of publication: July 2012

Publication type: Website

In a nutshell: A new service in west Norfolk will mean patients who are coming to the end of their lives will have greater choice on receiving professional care and support within their own homes. The Hospice at Home Service aims to improve the care on offer to patents with palliative care needs such as cancer, motor neurone disease or other long term conditions. It has been commissioned by West Norfolk Clinical Commissioning Group as part of its Palliative Care Strategy and will be provided by Norfolk Community Health and Care NHS Trust (NCH&C) in partnership with Norfolk Hospice – Tapping House and Marie Curie Cancer Care. It is expected that the service will be in place from September.

 

 

 


‘That’s part of everybody’s job’: the perspectives of health care staff in England and New Zealand on the meaning and remit of palliative care

March 29, 2012

Source: Palliative Medicine v.26(3) p.232-241

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Date of publication: April 2012

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell: This article aims to explore understandings of, and perceived roles in relation to, palliative care provision amongst generalist and specialist health care providers in England and New Zealand.

Length of publication: 10 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library


The route to success in end of life care – achieving quality in ambulance services

February 28, 2012

Source: National End of  Life Care Programme

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Date of publication: February 2012

Publication type: Report

In a nutshell: Ambulance services make a crucial contribution to enabling people to have their stated care preferences met and to achieve a ‘good death’ – dying with dignity, ideally in the setting of their choice. The End of Life Care Strategy (DH 2008) recognised ambulance services’ key role in three important areas:
1. Rapid transfer of the dying
2. Developing appropriate transport for the person/carer
3. Developing robust information systems to ensure the wishes of the person (i.e. DNACPRs) are communicated to ambulance services and staff.

Length of publication: 40p.

Acknowledgement: National End of Life Care Programme  and Association of Ambulance Chief Executives


A global update on the development of palliative care services

January 28, 2012

Source: International Journal of Palliative Nursing, October 2011, 17, (10), p.472-476

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Date of publication: October 2011

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell: This editorial commentary on worldwide progress in hospice and palliative care service provision focusses on progress made and ongoing issues which were highlighted in a recent study published by the Worldwide Palliative Care Alliance.  Issues include the impact of national policies, increased clarification of palliative care terms and definitions, and initiatives raising public awareness, as well as funding and access to palliative care services.

Results show that there’s been a marked increase in the number of countries providing hospice and palliative care services.  The article explores some of the key factors behind the progress made and focuses on advocacy and policy developments.

Length of publication: 5 pages

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library. 

Acknowledgement: BNI


Evaluating Program Integration and the Rise in Collaboration: Case study of a palliative care network

January 28, 2012

Source: Journal of Palliative Care, Winter 2011, 27, (4), p.270 -279

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Date of publication: Winter 2011

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell: This article focuses on an attempt to build capacity to deliver palliative care in an integrated way across a range of communities in Ontario, Canada.  The objective was to achieve an effective integrated system that was cost-effective and responsive to patient’s needs.  14 communities were involved and overall the approach appears to be beneficial.  Change has been gradual and structural issues continue to be a challenge.

Length of publication: 9 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.