Volunteer navigation partnerships: Piloting a compassionate community approach to early palliative care

July 17, 2017

Source: BMC Palliative Care 2017 17:2

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Date of publication: July 2017

Publication type:  Journal Article

In a nutshell: A compassionate community approach to palliative care provides important rationale for building community-based hospice volunteer capacity. The goal of the project was to improve quality of life by developing independence, engagement, and community connections.

Length of publication: 11 pages

 


Early palliative care for patients with advanced cancer: a cluster-randomised controlled trial

June 9, 2014

Source: The Lancet,  v.383, (9930), pg 1721 – 1730

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Date of publication: May 2014

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell: Patients with advanced cancer have reduced quality of life, which tends to worsen towards the end of life. This research project assessed the effect of early palliative care in patients with advanced cancer on several aspects of quality of life.  The results suggest that although the difference in quality of life was non-significant at the primary endpoint, this trial shows promising findings that support early palliative care for patients with advanced cancer.

Length of publication: 10 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library

 


Educating families about end-of-life care in advanced dementia: acceptability of a Canadian family booklet to nurses from Canada, France, and Japan

March 28, 2013

Source: International Journal of Palliative Care v.19 (2): 67-74

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Date of publication: February 2013

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell: The families of people with late-stage dementia need to be informed about the course of the dementia and the comfort/palliative care option. A booklet was written for that purpose and can be provided to family members by physicians and nurses. The booklet may help nurses educate families about end-of-life issues in dementia palliative care, but local adaptation of the booklet content and physician engagement are necessary.

Length of publication: 8 pages

Some important notes: This article is available in full text to all NHS Staff using Athens, for more information about accessing full text follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Recommendations for improving the end-of-life care system for homeless populations: A qualitative study of the views of Canadian health and social services professionals.

September 24, 2012

Source: BMC Palliative Care 2012, 11(1) p.14

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Date of publication: September 2012

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell:  Homeless populations have complex and diverse end-of-life care needs. However, they typically die outside of the end-of-life care system. To date, few studies have explored barriers to the end-of-life care system for homeless populations. This qualitative study involving health and social services professionals from across Canada sought to identify barriers to the end-of-life care system for homeless populations and generate recommendations to improve their access to end-of-life care. The article concludes that homeless people may be underserved by the end-of-life care system as a result of barriers that they face to accessing end-of-life care services. Changes to rules and regulations that reflect the health needs and circumstances of homeless people and measures to improve continuity of care have the potential to increase equity in the end-of-life care system for this underserved population.

Length of publication: 16 pages

 


Evaluating Program Integration and the Rise in Collaboration: Case study of a palliative care network

January 28, 2012

Source: Journal of Palliative Care, Winter 2011, 27, (4), p.270 -279

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Date of publication: Winter 2011

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell: This article focuses on an attempt to build capacity to deliver palliative care in an integrated way across a range of communities in Ontario, Canada.  The objective was to achieve an effective integrated system that was cost-effective and responsive to patient’s needs.  14 communities were involved and overall the approach appears to be beneficial.  Change has been gradual and structural issues continue to be a challenge.

Length of publication: 9 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library. 


What “best practice” could be in Palliative Care: an analysis of statements on practice and ethics expressed by the main Health Organizations

July 16, 2010

Source: Biomed Central BMC Palliative Care, 2010, 9(1) doi:10.1186/1472-684X-9-1 

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Date of publication:  January 2010

Publication type:  Report

In a nutshell: 

This report seeks to determine if an implicit model of best practice in palliative care currently exists.  The researchers conducted a qualitative analysis of the statements on practice and ethics of palliative care from publications produced by the main health organizations involved in service design and delivery to establish which dimensions of end-of-life care are taken into consideration in developing models of care.  A total of 34 organizations were identified, 7 international organisations, and 27 organisations operating on the national level in four different countries (Australia, Canada, UK and United States).  The report concludes that there is no consensus about what constitutes best practice for end of life care however, examples of best practice are discussed.

Length of publication: 9 page report


Development, implementation, and process evaluation of a regional palliative care quality improvement project.

February 22, 2010

Title: Development, implementation, and process evaluation of a regional palliative care quality improvement project.

Follow this link for the abstract.

Source: Journal of Pain & Symptom Management 2009, 38(4) p483-495

Date of publication: October 2009

Publication Type: Article

In a nutshell: The delivery of optimal palliative care requires an integrated and coordinated approach of many health care providers across the continuum of care. In response to identified gaps the Palliative Care Integration Project (PCIP) was developed in Canada to improve continuity and decrease variability of care to palliative patients with cancer.

Length of publication: 13 pages

Some important notes: Contact your local health library for a copy of this article. Follow this link to locate your local health library.

Acknowledgement: Cinahl