A qualitative inquiry into the barriers and facilitators to achieving home death

August 29, 2017

Source: BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care  [E-pub ahead of print]  doi: 10.1136/bmjspcare-2016-001260

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Date of publication: July 2017

Publication type: Journal Article

In a nutshell:  Multiple barriers and facilitators to achieving death at home were identified in this study. Of particular significance was the identification of the fear and stigma associated with death among doctors, patients and their families serving as a barrier to home death, not previously identified in the literature. Additionally, the importance of social networks and resource provision were highlighted as key in influencing patient death at home.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 

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Implementing the compassion intervention, a model for integrated care for people with advanced dementia towards the end of life in nursing homes: a naturalistic feasibility study

August 29, 2017

Source: BMJ Open  

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Date of publication: June 2017

Publication type: Journal Article

In a nutshell:  Many people with dementia die in nursing homes, but quality of care may be suboptimal.  The article discusses a theory-driven ‘Compassion Intervention’ to enhance end-of-life care in advanced dementia.  The Intervention prompted improvements in advance care planning, pain management and person-centred care.

Length of publication: 16 pages


Volunteer navigation partnerships: Piloting a compassionate community approach to early palliative care

July 17, 2017

Source: BMC Palliative Care 2017 17:2

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Date of publication: July 2017

Publication type:  Journal Article

In a nutshell: A compassionate community approach to palliative care provides important rationale for building community-based hospice volunteer capacity. The goal of the project was to improve quality of life by developing independence, engagement, and community connections.

Length of publication: 11 pages

 


Effect of specialist palliative care services on quality of life in adults with advanced incurable illness in hospital, hospice, or community settings: systematic review and meta-analysis

July 17, 2017

Source: BMJ 2017; 357: j2925

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Date of publication: July 2017

Publication type: Journal Article

In a nutshell: This review found that specialist palliative care was associated with a small effect on QoL and might have a profound effect on patients with cancer and could be most effective if provided early and if it identifies through screening patients with unmet needs.

Length of publication: 14 pages

 


Improving hospital-based end of life care processes and outcomes: a systematic review of research output, quality and effectiveness

June 22, 2017

Source: BMC Palliative Care 2017; 16 (1): 34

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Date of publication: May 2017

Publication type: Journal Article

In a nutshell: This systematic review examines the quantity and quality of data-based research aimed at improving the processes and outcomes associated with delivering end-of-life care in hospital settings. The study concludes that more methodologically robust studies are needed to evaluate the impact of interventions on end-of-life processes, including whether changes in processes translate to improved end-of-life outcomes.

Length of publication: 13 pages


What are the current challenges of managing cancer pain and could digital technologies help?

June 22, 2017

Source: BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care 2017 May 29. [Epub ahead of print]

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Date of publication: May 2017

Publication type: Journal Article

In a nutshell: This article explores current cancer pain management strategies used by patients, caregivers and professionals and investigates if digital technologies can enhance cancer pain management.

Length of publication: 10 pages


How many people will need palliative care in 2040? Past trends, future projections and implications for services

June 22, 2017

Source: BMC Medicine 2017; 15 (1): 102

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Date of publication: May 2017

Publication type: Journal Article

In a nutshell: This article projects that the number of people requiring palliative care over the next 25 years is likely to increase substantially, requiring a shift in healthcare priorities in England and Wales. By 2040, at least 160,000 more people each year are likely to have palliative care needs, including pain management of chronic illnesses and end-of-life care at hospitals, hospices, and at home.

Length of publication: 10 pages