UK quality statements on end of life care in dementia: a systematic review of research evidence

November 3, 2015

Source: BMC Palliative Care 2015 v14.:51

Follow this link for the full text article

Date of publication: October 2015

Publication type: Research article

In a nutshell: The importance of a palliative approach in the care of people with dementia is recognised and there are national polices to enhance current care. In the UK implementation of these polices is promoted by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) Dementia Quality Standards (QS). Since publication of the QS new care interventions have been developed. This article critically reviews current research evidence relevant to EOL Quality Standards. The article concludes that Quality statements relevant to EOL care are useful to advance practice however they have a limited evidence base. High quality empirical work is needed to establish that the recommendations in these statements are best practice.

Length of publication: 15 pages

 

 

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Communication between family carers and health professionals about end-of-life care for older people in the acute hospital setting: a qualitative study

September 7, 2015

Source: BMC Palliative Care 2015

Follow this link for the full-text article

Date of publication: August 2015

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell: This paper focuses on communication between hospital staff and family carers of patients dying on acute hospital wards, with an emphasis on the family carers’ perspective. The results of this research indicate that carers’ experience of the end of life care of their relative was enhanced when mutual understanding was achieved with healthcare professionals. However, some carers reported communication to be ineffective. They felt unsure about what was happening with their relative and were distressed by the experience of their relative’s end of life care. In conclusion, it is suggested that establishing a concordant relationship, based on negotiated understanding of shared perspectives, can help to improve communication between healthcare professionals and family carers of their patients.

Length of publication: 14 pages

 


End of life care improving according to report

July 10, 2015

Source: Public Health England

Follow this link for the press release

Date of publication: June 26th

Publication type: Press release

In a nutshell: The ‘What We Know Now 2014’ report suggests a growing understanding within the health sector of what is important to people at the end of life. The report finds that home continues to be the preferred place of death for people in England, followed by hospices and care homes. The proportion of people dying at home or in care homes has increased from 35% (166,749) in 2004 to 44% (207,764) in 2013. The number of people dying in hospitals has dropped by 50,000 since 2004. In 2013, this was less than half of all deaths (227,748).

The factors most important to people at the end of their life are having pain and other symptoms managed effectively, being surrounded by loved ones and being treated with dignity.

 


When dying at home is not an option: Exploration of hostel staff views on palliative care for homeless people

July 9, 2015

Source: International Journal of Palliative Nursing 2015 v.21(5) p236-44

Follow this link for the article abstract

Date of publication: May 2015

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell: The Department of Health in the UK suggests that hostel staff are the most appropriate key workers for their dying homeless residents and that hospital based palliative care maybe the best way forward. However, little is known about the views of hostel staff with regard to this. The article findings clearly lend support to the suggestion that hostel workers probably are indeed the most appropriate people to sup­port a dying homeless person. However, enhanced collaborative working, access to accu­rate and up-to-date medical information and clearer lines of communication between health professionals and hostel workers could result in better outcomes for this population in terms of having a voice that is heard, being offered choices regarding care options, and being treated with the same dignity and respect that the rest of the population has come to expect at the end of life

Length of publication: 9 pages

Some important notes: This article is available in full text to all NHS Staff using Athens, for more information about accessing full text follow this link to find your local NHS Library

 


Future care planning: a first step to palliative care for all patients with advanced heart disease

July 9, 2015

Source: Heart July 2015, Volume 101(13) p.1002-7

Follow this link for the article abstract

Date of publication: July 2015

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell: Palliative care is recommended for patients with end-stage heart failure with several recent, randomised trials showing improvements in symptoms and quality of life and more studies underway. Future care planning provides a framework for discussing a range of palliative care problems with patients and their families. This approach can be introduced at any time during the patient’s journey of care and ideally well in advance of end-of-life care. Future care planning is applicable to a wide range of patients with advanced heart disease and could be delivered systematically by cardiology teams at the time of an unplanned hospital admission, akin to cardiac rehabilitation for myocardial infarction.

Integrating cardiology care and palliative care can benefit many patients with advanced heart disease at increased risk of death or hospitalisation.

Length of publication: 6 pages

Some important notes: This article is available in full text to all NHS Staff using Athens, for more information about accessing full text follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 


Non-cancer palliative care in the community needs greater interprofessional collaboration to maintain coordinated care and manage uncertainty

July 9, 2015

Source: Evidence-based Nursing 2015 v.18(3) p79

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: July 2015

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell: Patients with non-cancer conditions often experience community palliative care as inadequate and in need of planning and innovation. The perspectives of three main groups (patient, formal and informal carers) might help understand expectations and conflicts. This review aimed to identify, appraise and synthesise the evidence on views about the provision of palliative care for patients with non-malignant conditions by Palliative Care providers and to reveal any research gaps.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: This article is available in full text to all NHS Staff using Athens. For more information about accessing full text follow this link to find your local NHS Library

 


Preference for a single or shared room in a UK inpatient hospice: patient, family and staff perspectives

June 11, 2015

Source: BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care 2015 v.5(2) p169-174

Follow this link for the article abstract

Date of publication: June 2015

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell: This study investigated the preferences of patients, family and staff for single or shared rooms in a UK hospice. Patients most often stated a preference for a shared room, especially if they had experience of being in this room type at the hospice. The main reason for this preference was the company of others. Patients preferring single rooms cited the benefits of increased privacy, reduced noise and private facilities. Other patients said their room preference would depend on how ill they were. Carers valued the social contact and increased staff presence in shared rooms, but felt that single rooms were easier for visitors and more appropriate when patients reached the end of life. Staff found it easier to observe patients in a shared room, and to maintain privacy and confidentiality in a single room.

In conclusion the study concludes that single and shared rooms should be available in a hospice. Innovative planning can enable the social benefits of shared rooms to be maintained without compromising patients’ privacy and dignity.

Length of publication: 6 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.