New animated film helps parents talk about cancer

March 9, 2017

Source: ehospice

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Date of publication: February 2017

Publication type: Film

In a nutshell: A new short animation produced by the University College London Hospital is helping parents talk to their children about being diagnosed with cancer. It shows a cartoon family coming to terms with the news, and contains practical tips on handling all the likely emotions and scenarios both the children and the parents might experience. Research shows that cartoon and comic-book formats are an effective way to communicate ideas that are sensitive or frightening.


Developing a model for embedded palliative care in a cancer clinic

March 9, 2017

Source: BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care 2017 Mar 3. [Epub ahead of print]

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Date of publication: March 2017

Publication type: Short report

In a nutshell: This article describes the development and key features of a model for embedded palliative care for patients with advanced kidney cancer or melanoma seen in a cancer clinic.

Length of publication: 4 pages


Is dying in hospital better than home in incurable cancer and what factors influence this? A population-based study

October 9, 2015

Source: BMC Medicine 2015, 13:235

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Date of publication: October 2015

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell: This study aims to determine the association between place of death, health services used, and pain, feeling at peace, and grief intensity.  The authors determined factors influencing death at home, and associations between place of death and pain, peace, and grief. Findings suggest that dying at home is better than hospital for peace and grief, but requires a discussion of preferences, GP home visits, and relatives to be given time off work.

Length of publication: 14 pages

 


Transforming Cancer and End of Life Care

August 11, 2014

Source: Staffordshire Cancer and End of Life Care

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Date of publication: July 2014

Publication type: Website

In a nutshell: The Transforming Cancer and End of Life Care Programme is a new and pioneering programme to transform the way people with cancer or those at the end of their life are cared for and supported in Staffordshire and Stoke-on-Trent. Macmillan Cancer Support is working with four Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs), local authorities and NHS England.

 


Can we live with how we’re dying? Advancing the case for free social care at the end of life

July 9, 2014

Source: Macmillan Cancer Support

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Date of publication: July 2014

Publication type: Report

In a nutshell: A new report from Macmillan Cancer Support argues that the NHS could save £69million each year by providing community care to allow cancer patients in England to die at home instead of in hospital.

Length of publication: 13 pages


Early palliative care for patients with advanced cancer: a cluster-randomised controlled trial

June 9, 2014

Source: The Lancet,  v.383, (9930), pg 1721 – 1730

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Date of publication: May 2014

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell: Patients with advanced cancer have reduced quality of life, which tends to worsen towards the end of life. This research project assessed the effect of early palliative care in patients with advanced cancer on several aspects of quality of life.  The results suggest that although the difference in quality of life was non-significant at the primary endpoint, this trial shows promising findings that support early palliative care for patients with advanced cancer.

Length of publication: 10 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library

 


Early admission to community-based palliative care reduces use of emergency departments in the ninety days before death

May 22, 2013

Source: Journal of Palliative Medicine Online Ahead of Print: May 15, 2013

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Date of publication: May 2013

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell: This study investigates whether early admission to community-based palliative care reduces emergency department admissions in the last 90 days of life for patients with cancer. Using data from death registrations and hospital morbidity for 746 Western Australian adults who had died from cancer, the results suggest that proactive care in the form of timely community-based palliative care services assists in preventing vulnerable people at the end of life from being exposed to the stressful emergency department environment and decreases pressure on EDs.

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.