Non-cancer palliative care in the community needs greater interprofessional collaboration to maintain coordinated care and manage uncertainty

July 9, 2015

Source: Evidence-based Nursing 2015 v.18(3) p79

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: July 2015

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell: Patients with non-cancer conditions often experience community palliative care as inadequate and in need of planning and innovation. The perspectives of three main groups (patient, formal and informal carers) might help understand expectations and conflicts. This review aimed to identify, appraise and synthesise the evidence on views about the provision of palliative care for patients with non-malignant conditions by Palliative Care providers and to reveal any research gaps.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: This article is available in full text to all NHS Staff using Athens. For more information about accessing full text follow this link to find your local NHS Library

 

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Development of the Carers’ Alert Thermometer (CAT) to identify family carers struggling with caring for someone dying at home: a mixed method consensus study

May 6, 2015

Source: BMC Palliative Care 2015 14; 22

Follow this link for the full text article

Date of publication: May 2015

Publication type: Research article

In a nutshell: The aim of the study was to explore what professionals and carers of patients with cancer and advanced progressive illness, in their last year of life, find burdensome and to develop an alert system for use by non-specialist staff. A mixed-method, multi-phased, consensus study sequentially utilising qualitative and quantitative data to develop and pilot the Carers’ Alert Thermometer (CAT). 245 people participated in the study across a range of health and social care settings in the North West of England (2011–2014). The results identified a number of key domains for inclusion in the CAT. The 8 domains fit within two overarching themes of the reported carer experience; the support needed by the carer to provide care and the support needed for the carer’s own health and well-being. The resultant CAT is an evidence-based alert thermometer consisting of 10 questions, guidance on the possible actions for each alert and space for an action plan to be jointly agreed by the assessor and carer. Preliminary piloting of the CAT has shown it to be valued, fit for purpose and it can be administered by a range of personnel. In conclusion, the CAT enables the identification of current and potential future needs so a proactive approach can be taken to supporting the carer as their role develops over time, with a view to enhancing their well-being and preventing avoidable hospital admissions; ultimately supporting patient choice to remain in their own home.

Length of publication: 21 pages

 


Living and dying with dementia in Scotland: Barriers to care

February 3, 2015

Source: Marie Curie Cancer Care

Follow this link for the full report

Date of publication: February 2015

Publication type: Report

In a nutshell: This report addresses the challenge of improving care and support available to people with dementia at the end of life as well as their families. By focusing on the barriers, improvements can be made in care and can ensure that all those who might benefit from it receive it.

Length of publication: 24p.

 


Caring for people in the last days and hours of life – Guidance

January 9, 2015

Source: The Scottish Government

Follow this link for the full-text report

Date of publication: December 2014

Publication type: Guidance

In a nutshell: The Scottish Government has published new national guidance to support clinical and care staff who are planning and providing care during the last days and hours of life, following the phasing out of the Liverpool Care Pathway.

Length of publication: 15 pages

 


The lived experiences of the Sikh population of south east England when caring for a dying relative at home

June 9, 2014

Source: International Journal of Palliative Nursing  v.20(4), p179-86

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: April 2014

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell:  This project aimed to explore and understand the experiences of the Sikh population of south east England when caring for a dying relative at home without support from Specialist Palliative Care (SPC). The results reports that five super-ordinate themes were identified: factors leading to the caring role, emotional effects of caring on the carer, impact of caring on the wider family, influence of health-care services, and religious and cultural influence. The most common emergent theme was lack of support from health professionals, which emerged from a lack of awareness of services. The article concludes that there is a need for health professionals to reach out to this population to increase awareness of and trust in the services that are available to support care at the end of life. However, an unwillingness to accept assistance may persist in some cases.

Length of publication: 8 pages

Some important notes: This article is available in full text to all NHS Staff using Athens, for more information about accessing full text follow this link to find your local NHS Library

 


Listening to dying people in Wales

May 6, 2014

Source: Marie Curie Cancer Care

Follow this link for the full report

Date of publication: April 2014

Publication type: Report

In a nutshell: Each individual will have personal wishes about where they wish to be cared for and where they wish to die.  They will also have many non-healthcare needs which impact on their well-being just as much as their healthcare does. In a new report, Listening to Dying People in Wales, Marie Curie Cancer Care looks at the methods currently in place for gathering experience feedback from terminally ill people and their families and carers. The report argues that if current services are to do the best for dying people in Wales they must find out about people’s experiences of the care they received at the end of their lives. Only then will those that plan and deliver services be able to make informed decisions based upon people’s needs.

Length of publication: 14 pages

 


The rich picture on people at end of life

August 24, 2012

Source: Macmillan Cancer Support

Follow this link to download the publication

Date of publication: August 2012

Publication type: Evidence-based summaries

In a nutshell: The rich pictures are engaging evidence-based summaries of the numbers, needs and experiences of different groupings within with the two million people living with cancer in the UK. They contain a range of evidence and insight including how many people are within the group, and what their typical needs and experiences are.

Length of publication:60 pages