Non-cancer palliative care in the community needs greater interprofessional collaboration to maintain coordinated care and manage uncertainty

July 9, 2015

Source: Evidence-based Nursing 2015 v.18(3) p79

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: July 2015

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell: Patients with non-cancer conditions often experience community palliative care as inadequate and in need of planning and innovation. The perspectives of three main groups (patient, formal and informal carers) might help understand expectations and conflicts. This review aimed to identify, appraise and synthesise the evidence on views about the provision of palliative care for patients with non-malignant conditions by Palliative Care providers and to reveal any research gaps.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: This article is available in full text to all NHS Staff using Athens. For more information about accessing full text follow this link to find your local NHS Library

 


Can we live with how we’re dying? Advancing the case for free social care at the end of life

July 9, 2014

Source: Macmillan Cancer Support

Follow this link for the full report

Date of publication: July 2014

Publication type: Report

In a nutshell: A new report from Macmillan Cancer Support argues that the NHS could save £69million each year by providing community care to allow cancer patients in England to die at home instead of in hospital.

Length of publication: 13 pages


Community care is a means to a better end

December 21, 2012

Source: Health Service Journal 10 December 2012

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Date of publication: December 2012

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell: This article comments on a number of reports providing evidence that community-based services can improve the quality of end of life care.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library


Palliative care in the community: the complexity of service provision

December 19, 2011

Source: British Journal of Community Nursing 2011 Vol. 16(12), p 574

Follow this link for the abstract of  the article

Date of publication: November 2011

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell: Care of people in the last period of their lives frequently falls to nurses working in primary care. Nurses with different roles, working in various settings, will be involved throughout the patient’s disease trajectory. Familial carers may also have contact with health services in a number of guises, whether it be for their own health, or that of their family member

Length of Publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Contact your local health library for a copy of this article. Follow this link to follow your local health library.


New end of life care resource pack makes its mark

October 27, 2011

Title: New end of life care resource pack makes its mark

Source: Macmillan and NHS National Programme for End of Life Care Joint Newsletter

Follow this link for the newsletter

Date of publication: October 2011

In a nutshell: This article describes  a special resource pack which aims to bring together helpful advice and information on end of life care in one place. Macmillan GPs in Blackpool, Wyre and Fylde developed the resource  which contains a number of laminated single-page documents covering such topics as the local end of life care timeline model, palliative care and prescribing guidance together with useful local contact details. This is supplemented with additional material from sources such as the GMC, Macmillan and Marie Curie Cancer Care and is pulled together in a plastic document box.

Length of publication: 1 page

Acknowledgements: NHS National Programme for End of Life Care


NHS Evidence QIPP, case study: End of Life Care

December 16, 2010

Source:  NHS Evidence

Follow this link for fulltext

Date of publication:  November 2010

Publication type:  Case Study

In a nutshell:  The objective of this collaborative working between nursing and AHP staff working for Thames Hospicecare, an independent hospice and Berkshire East Community Services was to improve qualified staff competence and confidence in delivering end of life care (EoLC) for patients in a community hospital setting.  

Current emphasis is on providing EoLC in communities rather than the acute setting but this is not always achievable or what the patient wants. Utilising community hospitals can be a more cost-effective option and also enable the local hospice inpatient unit to focus on providing complex care for patients who need it.  The case study explicitly shows the evidence of success in terms of financial and quality of care benefits.

Length of publication:  9 pages


Associations between successful palliative cancer pathways and community nurse involvement

December 18, 2009

Source: BMC Palliative Care 2009, 8:18

Follow this link for the article

Date of Publication: December 2009

Publication Type: Article

In a nutshell: This article reports on research carried out in Denmark examining the associations between bereaved relatives evaluation of palliative treatment at home and 1) place of death and 2) community nurse involvement. Most terminally ill cancer patients and their relatives wish that the patient dies at home and community nurses are often the frontline worker and their involvement may be important to attaining successful palliative pathways at home.

Acknowledgement: BioMed Central