End-of-life-care after the Liverpool Care Pathway

May 2, 2014

Source: British Journal of Community Nursing 2014, v.19(5) pp 250 – 254

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: May 2014

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell: This article presents a review of key issues around caring for people in the last hours and days of life. The aim is that community nurses will be able to support patients and families, and to provide and explain decisions and interventions to promote comfort and dignity based on current evidence.

Length of publication: 5 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 

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A ‘good death’ at home: community nurses helping to make it possible

February 1, 2013

Source: British Journal of Community Nursing, v.18(1),  pp40 – 42

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: January 2013

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell: This article discusses current end of life policies and how the community nurse is central to their implementation. It draws on some recent research which has identified the important steps that enable a community nurse to facilitate a good death and a particular research study which illustrated the unique role of the Community Nurse in providing end of life care in a rural setting, but also the challenges.

Length of publication: 3 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

Acknowledgement: Internurse


Evaluation of the Dignity Care Pathway for community nurses caring for people at the end of life

December 27, 2012

Source: International Journal of Palliative Nursing

Follow this link for the full-text article

Date of publication: October 2012

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell: A central principle of palliative care is to help people die with dignity. The Dignity Care Pathway (DCP) is an intervention based on the Chochinov theoretical model of dignity care. It has four sections: a manual, a Patient Dignity Inventory, reflective questions, and care actions. This article examines the  feasibility and acceptability of the DCP using a qualitative design with a purposive sample of community nurses. The DCP was acceptable to the community nurses, helped them identify when patients were at the end of life, identified patients’ key concerns, and aided nurses in providing holistic end-of-life care. In conclusion, The DCP helps nurses to deliver individualised care and psychological care, which has previously been identified as a difficult area for community nurses. All of the nurses wished to continue to use the DCP and would recommend it to others.

Length of publication: 7 pages

Some important notes: This article is available in full text to all NHS Staff using Athens, for more information about accessing full text follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Is an advance care planning model feasible in community palliative care? A multi-site action research approach

July 27, 2012

Source: Journal of Advanced Nursing 2012

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: September 2012

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell: This article reports a study to determine the feasibility of an advance care planning model developed with Australian community palliative care services. The article concludes that an advance care planning model is feasible for community palliative care services. Quality audit processes are an essential component of the Model with documentation of advance care planning discussion established as an important outcome measure.

Length of publication: 13 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Palliative care in the community: the complexity of service provision

December 19, 2011

Source: British Journal of Community Nursing 2011 Vol. 16(12), p 574

Follow this link for the abstract of  the article

Date of publication: November 2011

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell: Care of people in the last period of their lives frequently falls to nurses working in primary care. Nurses with different roles, working in various settings, will be involved throughout the patient’s disease trajectory. Familial carers may also have contact with health services in a number of guises, whether it be for their own health, or that of their family member

Length of Publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Contact your local health library for a copy of this article. Follow this link to follow your local health library.


Nurses’ needs in delivering palliative care for long-term conditions

June 24, 2011

Source: British Journal of Community Nursing 2011, v.16(6), p274-281

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of Publication: June 2011

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell:  This study examined the needs of community nurses delivering palliative care to people with long-term conditions.  Ten community nurses (Band 5-7) were recruited for the study. Findings from the study  highlighted 4 needs: establishing therapeutic relationships, having access to resources, co-ordination and provision of clinical care and collaborative working which the community nurses believed if met, they could deliver palliative care to their patients. Issues around a lack of resources, community nurses’ educational needs and the late referral of patients with non-malignant long-term conditions to community nursing were also identified.

Length of publication: 8 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of this article. Follow this link to find you local NHS Library.

Acknowledgements: Internurse


The role of health care assistants in supporting district nurses and family carers to deliver palliative care at home: findings from an evaluation project

June 23, 2011

Source: Journal of Clinical Nursing vol.20(13-14), p2043-2052

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Date: July 2011

Publication type: Article

Publication length: 10 pages

In a nutshell: This article examines the role of trained health and personal care assistants supporting district nurses and family carers in providing palliative and end of life care in the community. Findings from this study suggest that employing health care assistants under the supervision of district nurses appear to  support patients and families at home and contribute to good quality nursing care.

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.