End of life care in the community: the impact of poor coordination

March 10, 2015

Source: ehospice.com

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Date of publication: February 2015

Publication type: Blog

In a nutshell: The author refers to her friend’s terminal phase of her disease, highlighting how poor communication and coordination of care can make spending your lasts weeks and months at home a stressful and unhappy experience for everyone involved.

Length of publication:  1 page

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How community-based nursing in Scotland can ease the pressure on the NHS

February 5, 2015

Source: Marie Curie Cancer Care

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Date of publication: February 2015

Publication type: Blog

In a nutshell: This blog from Diana Hekerem comments on the shifting of resources from acute services into the community in order that people can be cared for at home if they have no clinical need to be in hospital. The blog highlights the Marie Curie Nursing Service community-based models of care which have supported patients to spend their final weeks at home in a hospice; facilitated safe and timely discharge and offer general nursing and emotional support.

 


Can comprehensive specialised end-of-life care be provided at home? Lessons from a study of an innovative consultant-led community service in the UK

September 9, 2014

Source: European Journal of Cancer Care 2014 doi: 10.1111/ecc.12195

Follow this link to download the full article

Date of publication: April 2014 (online ahead of print)

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell: The Midhurst Macmillan Specialist Palliative Care Service (MMSPCS) is a UK, medical consultant-led, multidisciplinary team aiming to provide round-the-clock advice and care, including specialist interventions, in the home, community hospitals and care homes. The authors present a study of the Midhurst Macmillan Specialist Palliative Care Service, which provides specialised hands-on palliative care in a community setting in an area of South-East England, UK. This service is distinct in that it is medical consultant-led and aims to deliver interventions in the home setting that are usually considered to require hospital admission. Patients and carers reported positive experiences of support, linked to the flexible way the service worked.

Length of publication: 14p.

 


National Survey of Bereaved People (VOICES), 2013

July 10, 2014

Source: Office for National Statistics

Follow this link to download the report

Date of publication: July 2014

Publication type: Statistical Report

In a nutshell: Key findings from the 2013 National Survey of Bereaved People suggest:

  • Overall quality of care has not changed significantly between 2011, 2012 and 2013.
  • Quality of care was rated significantly lower for people who died in a hospital, compared to people dying at home, in a hospice or care home.
  • For those dying at home, the quality of coordination of care was rated significantly lower in 2013 compared to 2012.
  • The dignity and respect for patients shown by hospital nurses and hospice nurses has increased between 2011 and 2013.
  • Pain is relieved most effectively in the hospice setting (62%) and least effectively at home (18%).
  • Only one third of people (35%) who express a preference to die at home, actually die at home.

Length of publication: 24 pages

 


Commissioning home care for older people

July 9, 2014

Source: Social Care Institute for Excellence

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Date of publication: June 2014

Publication type: Guidelines

In a nutshell: This guide captures the latest research findings on this important and emerging area of social care. It also provides some practice examples of good work in this area. The guide is aimed at health and social care commissioners of home care services for older people with complex needs.

Length of publication: 40 pages

 


The lived experiences of the Sikh population of south east England when caring for a dying relative at home

June 9, 2014

Source: International Journal of Palliative Nursing  v.20(4), p179-86

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Date of publication: April 2014

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell:  This project aimed to explore and understand the experiences of the Sikh population of south east England when caring for a dying relative at home without support from Specialist Palliative Care (SPC). The results reports that five super-ordinate themes were identified: factors leading to the caring role, emotional effects of caring on the carer, impact of caring on the wider family, influence of health-care services, and religious and cultural influence. The most common emergent theme was lack of support from health professionals, which emerged from a lack of awareness of services. The article concludes that there is a need for health professionals to reach out to this population to increase awareness of and trust in the services that are available to support care at the end of life. However, an unwillingness to accept assistance may persist in some cases.

Length of publication: 8 pages

Some important notes: This article is available in full text to all NHS Staff using Athens, for more information about accessing full text follow this link to find your local NHS Library

 


New service in Fife to support terminally ill at home

March 6, 2014

Source: ehospice.com

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Date of publication: February 2014

Publication type: Website

In a nutshell: A new pilot service, run by Marie Curie in partnership with NHS Fife, will deliver tailored care and support at home for terminally ill Fife residents and their families. The service will be coordinated with a locally based team, through a single point of contact and offer a range of support tailored to individual need. It will provide:

  • Short and long periods of nursing care for patients and support for carers.
  • Health and personal care, emotional support and practical assistance following a patient’s immediate discharge from hospital, and additional support to prevent hospital admissions or readmissions.
  • Companionship, emotional support and practical information provided by trained volunteers.