Exploring the cost of care at the end of life

October 2, 2014

Source: The Nuffield Trust

Follow this link for the full report

Date of publication: September 2014

Publication type: Research report

In a nutshell: This report explores the cost of care at the end of life’ uses anonymised person-level datasets to estimate the costs at the end of life relating to GP contacts, community nursing, local authority-funded social care, hospice and hospital care. The research also explores whether reduced hospital activity and costs at the end of life were likely to be offset by increased care costs in other health and social care settings using the Marie Curie home-based palliative care nursing service. The results suggest that cost savings might be available if community-based support were made more widely available to help people to die in their own homes, where that was their preference.

Length of publication: 31p.

 

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Dutch model offers new approach to home care

August 13, 2014

Source: Australian Ageing Agenda

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Date of publication: August 2014

Publication type: Web article

In a nutshell: The Buutzong model of nursing, where small teams of nurses provide home care services, supported by technology and with minimal administrative nursing, is spreading internationally. Under the model, small teams of up to 12 nurses work in close collaboration with patients, doctors, allied health professionals and informal community networks to support the patient.

While the costs per hour are higher from employing registered nurses, savings are made through lower overhead costs and a reduction in the overall number of care hours required per client.

Acknowledgement: ehospice


Can we live with how we’re dying? Advancing the case for free social care at the end of life

July 9, 2014

Source: Macmillan Cancer Support

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Date of publication: July 2014

Publication type: Report

In a nutshell: A new report from Macmillan Cancer Support argues that the NHS could save £69million each year by providing community care to allow cancer patients in England to die at home instead of in hospital.

Length of publication: 13 pages


Dying at home: A qualitative study of the perspectives of older South Asians living in the United Kingdom

February 10, 2014

Source: Palliative Medicine 2014 v.28(3), p.264-272

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: March 2014

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell: This article aims to explore beliefs, attitudes and expectations expressed by older South Asians living in East London about dying at home. Findings suggest that older people of South Asian ethnicity living in East London perceive home as more than a physical location for dying relatives. They make efforts to adhere, and also adapt, to important social and cultural values relating to death and dying as part of the wider challenge of living in an emigrant society.

Length of publication: 8 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 


Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of home palliative care services for adults with advanced illness and their caregivers

August 9, 2013

Source:  The Cochrane Library

Follow this link to download the review

Date of publication: June 2013

Publication type: Systematic Review

In a nutshell: A new review from the Cochrane Pain, Palliative and Supportive Care Group looked at the impact of home palliative care services on the chances of dying at home and on other outcomes for patients and their caregivers, such as symptom control and quality of life. The review team also aimed to compare resource use and costs associated with these services and summarize the current evidence on cost-effectiveness.

Length of publication: 281 pages


Midhurst Macmillan Community Specialist Palliative Care Service: Delivering end-of-life care in the community

August 9, 2013

Source: The King’s Fund

Follow this link to download the full-text report

Date of publication: August 2013

Publication type: Report

In a nutshell: the aim of this report was to establish whether community specialist palliative care services offering home nursing increased rates of death at home (avoiding hospitalisation) compared to other models. The review concluded that the evidence that palliative care home nursing for patients with life-limiting illnesses increased the rate of death at home without compromising symptoms, quality of life or increasing costs was inconclusive. The authors’ conclusions are suitably cautious given the limited evidence available.

Length of publication: 34p.

 


Reduction in symptoms for homebound patients receiving Home-based Primary and Palliative Care

July 1, 2013

Source: Journal of Palliative Medicine

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: Online ahead of print: 8 June 2013

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell: The purpose of this study was to determine whether high symptom burden decreases following Home-Based Primary and Palliative Care (HBPC) enrollment. The article concludes that in a chronically ill population of urban home-bound, patient symptoms can be successfully managed in the home. The authors recommend future work should continue to explore symptom assessment and management over time for the chronically ill home-bound.

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.