One in four UK families who need end of life care missing out on crucial support

July 17, 2017

Source: Hospice UK

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Date of publication: July 2017

Publication type: News Item

In a nutshell:  One in four people who require end of life care and their families are not getting the support they need – especially those with conditions other than cancer – according to new analysis published by Hospice UK.  Hospice UK has launched a new campaign called Open Up Hospice Care. It aims to raise awareness among the public about the fact that hospice care is available to all people, regardless of who they are; their sexual orientation, ethnicity, disability or illness.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: A briefing paper for the campaign can be found here

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Heart failure and hospice care: how to make a difference

May 17, 2017

Source: Hospice UK

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Date of publication: May 2017

Publication type: Report

In a nutshell: This guide is intended for people providing and commissioning hospice services. Its purpose is to raise awareness of the need for a hospice-enabled approach to heart failure, and to suggest ways to engage with this issue using examples from services which have found creative solutions to move forward and overcome the challenges.

Length of publication: 44 pages


Hospice care in the UK 2016

January 10, 2017

Source: Hospice UK

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Date of publication: November 2016

Publication type: Report

In a nutshell: This report sets out the vital contribution that hospices in the UK make to supporting people with terminal and life-shortening conditions and explores the scope, scale and opportunities for hospice care in the UK in 2016.

Length of publication: 24 pages


Preference for a single or shared room in a UK inpatient hospice: patient, family and staff perspectives

June 11, 2015

Source: BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care 2015 v.5(2) p169-174

Follow this link for the article abstract

Date of publication: June 2015

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell: This study investigated the preferences of patients, family and staff for single or shared rooms in a UK hospice. Patients most often stated a preference for a shared room, especially if they had experience of being in this room type at the hospice. The main reason for this preference was the company of others. Patients preferring single rooms cited the benefits of increased privacy, reduced noise and private facilities. Other patients said their room preference would depend on how ill they were. Carers valued the social contact and increased staff presence in shared rooms, but felt that single rooms were easier for visitors and more appropriate when patients reached the end of life. Staff found it easier to observe patients in a shared room, and to maintain privacy and confidentiality in a single room.

In conclusion the study concludes that single and shared rooms should be available in a hospice. Innovative planning can enable the social benefits of shared rooms to be maintained without compromising patients’ privacy and dignity.

Length of publication: 6 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


End of life care in the community: the impact of poor coordination

March 10, 2015

Source: ehospice.com

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Date of publication: February 2015

Publication type: Blog

In a nutshell: The author refers to her friend’s terminal phase of her disease, highlighting how poor communication and coordination of care can make spending your lasts weeks and months at home a stressful and unhappy experience for everyone involved.

Length of publication:  1 page


How community-based nursing in Scotland can ease the pressure on the NHS

February 5, 2015

Source: Marie Curie Cancer Care

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Date of publication: February 2015

Publication type: Blog

In a nutshell: This blog from Diana Hekerem comments on the shifting of resources from acute services into the community in order that people can be cared for at home if they have no clinical need to be in hospital. The blog highlights the Marie Curie Nursing Service community-based models of care which have supported patients to spend their final weeks at home in a hospice; facilitated safe and timely discharge and offer general nursing and emotional support.

 


National Survey of Bereaved People (VOICES), 2013

July 10, 2014

Source: Office for National Statistics

Follow this link to download the report

Date of publication: July 2014

Publication type: Statistical Report

In a nutshell: Key findings from the 2013 National Survey of Bereaved People suggest:

  • Overall quality of care has not changed significantly between 2011, 2012 and 2013.
  • Quality of care was rated significantly lower for people who died in a hospital, compared to people dying at home, in a hospice or care home.
  • For those dying at home, the quality of coordination of care was rated significantly lower in 2013 compared to 2012.
  • The dignity and respect for patients shown by hospital nurses and hospice nurses has increased between 2011 and 2013.
  • Pain is relieved most effectively in the hospice setting (62%) and least effectively at home (18%).
  • Only one third of people (35%) who express a preference to die at home, actually die at home.

Length of publication: 24 pages