End-of-life-care after the Liverpool Care Pathway

May 2, 2014

Source: British Journal of Community Nursing 2014, v.19(5) pp 250 – 254

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: May 2014

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell: This article presents a review of key issues around caring for people in the last hours and days of life. The aim is that community nurses will be able to support patients and families, and to provide and explain decisions and interventions to promote comfort and dignity based on current evidence.

Length of publication: 5 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 

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Interim guidance: Caring for people in the last days and hours of life

December 27, 2013

Source: NHS Scotland

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Date of publication: December 2013

Publication type: Guidelines

In a nutshell: It has been announced that the Liverpool Care Pathway (LCP) will be phased out in Scotland over the next year. The Scottish Government has accepted the recommendations from the Living and Dying Well National Advisory Group. This follows the Neuberger review of the LCP in England, which found the framework has not always been used appropriately. Interim guidance on caring for people in the last days and hours of life has also been issued to all Scottish health boards, which will be followed until a new set of guidelines on best practice is available in 2014.The guidance places a strong emphasis on good, consistent communications by medical professionals with families and loved ones of patients.

Length of publication: 12 pages


Improving end-of-life care in nursing homes: Implementation and evaluation of an intervention to sustain quality of care

September 6, 2013

Source: Palliative Medicine 2013 v.27(8) pp772-778

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Date of publication: September 2013

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell: Internationally, policy calls for care homes to provide reliably good end-of-life care. The authors undertook a 20-month projectto sustain palliative care improvements achieved by a previous intervention. The aim was to sustain a high standard of palliative care in seven UK nursing care homes using a lower level of support than employed during the original project and to evaluate the effectiveness of this intervention. A lower level of nursing support managed to sustain and build on the initial outcomes. However, despite increased adoption of key end-of-life care tools, hospital deaths were higher during the sustainability project. While good support from palliative care nurse specialists and GPs can help ensure that key processes remain in place, stable management and key champions are vital to ensure that a palliative care approach becomes embedded within the culture of the care home.

Length of publication: 7 pages

 


Leadership alliance formed to respond to the independent review of the Liverpool Care Pathway

September 6, 2013

Source: NHS England

Follow this link for the webpage

Date of publication: August 2013

Publication type: Website

In a nutshell: A Leadership Alliance for the Care of Dying People (LACDP) is being set up under the chairmanship of Dr Bee Wee, National Clinical Director for End of Life Care at NHS England. The alliance, a coalition of regulatory and professional bodies aim to lead the way in creating and delivering the knowledge base, the education, training and skills and the long-term commitment needed to make high quality care for dying patients a reality, not just an ambition.


New end-of-life care group planned

September 6, 2013

Source: Health Service Journal

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Date of publication: August 2013

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell: The government is expected to announce a new coalition to examine end-of-life care in response to the scrapping of the controversial Liverpool Care Pathway (LCP). The alliance will provide guidance on what needs to occur in place of the LCP and will work with end-of-life healthcare professionals, patients and families on what good care means. It will also consider how to implement recommendations around the accountability and responsibility of individual clinicians, out-of-hours decisions, nutrition and hydration and communication with the patient and their relatives or carers.

Length of publication: 1p.

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

Acknowledgement: Insert text here


Communication diary to aid care at the end of life

April 26, 2012

Source: Nursing Times, 2012, 108, (17), p.24-27

Date of publication: April 2012

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell: This articles describes an action-research study which aimed to develop and test the “Relatives’/carers’ diary” tool from the Liverpool Care pathway.  The tool is aimed at reducing communication barriers between patient’s families or carers and healthcare staff in order to enable relatives to be able to participate usefully in end of life care and for healthcare staff to respond quickly to concerns or issues about all elements of care including pain management, quality of care.

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

Length of publication: 4 pages


Nurses’ views on using the Liverpool Care Pathway in an acute hospital setting

August 23, 2011

Source: International Journal of Palliative Nursing, 2011, 17(5) p.239-44

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Date of publication: May 2011

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell: This article describes a piece of qualitative research exploring nurses’ perceptions and experiences of using the Liverpool Care Pathway (LCP) for patients dying in an acute setting. The research examined the experiences of general nurses, and compared them with those of LCP link nurses who have a special interest in palliative and end-of-life care, through the use of focus groups.

Length of publication: 6 pages

Some important notes: An NHS Athens password is required to access this article online. Follow this link to register for Athens.

Acknowledgement: BNI