Living with and dying from advanced heart failure: understanding the needs of older patients at the end of life

November 4, 2015

Source: BMC Geriatrics October 2015

Follow this link for the full text article

Date of publication: October 2015

Publication type: Research article

In a nutshell: Old and very old patients with advanced heart failure often do not acknowledge the seriousness and severity of the disease. Their communication with physicians predominantly focuses on curative treatment. Therefore, aspects such as self-management of the disease, dealing with emergency situations and end-of-life issues should be addressed more prominently. An advanced care planning (ACP) programme for heart disease in older people could be an option to improve patient-centred care.

Length of publication: 21 pages

 


Communication between family carers and health professionals about end-of-life care for older people in the acute hospital setting: a qualitative study

September 7, 2015

Source: BMC Palliative Care 2015

Follow this link for the full-text article

Date of publication: August 2015

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell: This paper focuses on communication between hospital staff and family carers of patients dying on acute hospital wards, with an emphasis on the family carers’ perspective. The results of this research indicate that carers’ experience of the end of life care of their relative was enhanced when mutual understanding was achieved with healthcare professionals. However, some carers reported communication to be ineffective. They felt unsure about what was happening with their relative and were distressed by the experience of their relative’s end of life care. In conclusion, it is suggested that establishing a concordant relationship, based on negotiated understanding of shared perspectives, can help to improve communication between healthcare professionals and family carers of their patients.

Length of publication: 14 pages

 


Dignity and patient-centred care for people with palliative care needs in the acute hospital setting: A systematic review

September 2, 2015

Source: Palliative Medicine 2015 v.29(8) p675-694

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: September 2015

Publication type: Research article

In a nutshell: A systematic literature review was conducted to examine international evidence relating to dignity and patient-centred care for people with care needs in an acute hospital setting. The article concludes that acute hospital staff require adequate training, including symptom control, and the correct environment in which to deliver dignified and person-centred end-of-life care. Specific models/approaches to care can be beneficial, if adequate training regarding implementation is given. The needs of family members also require consideration, particularly following bereavement.

Length of publication: 20 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 


End of life care improving according to report

July 10, 2015

Source: Public Health England

Follow this link for the press release

Date of publication: June 26th

Publication type: Press release

In a nutshell: The ‘What We Know Now 2014’ report suggests a growing understanding within the health sector of what is important to people at the end of life. The report finds that home continues to be the preferred place of death for people in England, followed by hospices and care homes. The proportion of people dying at home or in care homes has increased from 35% (166,749) in 2004 to 44% (207,764) in 2013. The number of people dying in hospitals has dropped by 50,000 since 2004. In 2013, this was less than half of all deaths (227,748).

The factors most important to people at the end of their life are having pain and other symptoms managed effectively, being surrounded by loved ones and being treated with dignity.

 


Communicating with patients and their families about palliative and end-of-life care: comfort and educational needs of nurses

April 10, 2015

Source: International Journal of Palliative Nursing 2015 v.21 (3)

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: March 2015

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: The purpose of this study was to determine perceived needs of inpatient nurses for communicating with patients and families about palliative and end-of-life (EoL) care.

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library

 


What’s important to me: a review of choice in end of life care

March 16, 2015

Source: Choice in End of Life Care Programme Board

Follow this link for the full report

Date of publication: February 2015

Publication type: Report

In a nutshell: The independently led Review of Choice in End of Life Care has provided advice to Government which includes: establishing a ‘national choice offer’ focused on individual’s end of life care needs by April 2020; providing an additional £130 million funding for end of life health and social care services; establishing 24/7 community end of life care by 2019 in all areas implementing shared electronic end of life care records by April 2018 in all areas; and a named responsible senior clinician for all people approaching the end of life.

Length of publication: 72p.

 

 

 


Every moment counts: A narrative for person-centred coordinated care for people near the end of life care

March 11, 2015

Source: National Council for Palliative Care; National Voices

Follow this link for the full document

Date of publication: March 2015

Publication type: Narrative document

In a nutshell: Every Moment Counts: a narrative for person centred coordinated care for people near the end of life sets out how good, coordinated – or integrated – care looks to people near the end of life and is written from their point of view.

Length of publication: 26 pages