Place of death in children and young people with cancer and implications for end of life care: a population-based study in England, 1993–2014

October 18, 2016

Source: BMC Cancer 2016 Sep; 16 (727)

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Date of publication: September 2016

Publication type: Journal Article

In a nutshell: This study, funded by Marie Curie, looks at how the place of death in children and young people with cancer has changed over the period from 1993-2014, following a number of national initiatives to improve end-of-life care since the late 1990s. The study aims to inform evidence-based policy-making and service development.

Length of publication: 15 pages

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Is dying in hospital better than home in incurable cancer and what factors influence this? A population-based study

October 9, 2015

Source: BMC Medicine 2015, 13:235

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Date of publication: October 2015

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell: This study aims to determine the association between place of death, health services used, and pain, feeling at peace, and grief intensity.  The authors determined factors influencing death at home, and associations between place of death and pain, peace, and grief. Findings suggest that dying at home is better than hospital for peace and grief, but requires a discussion of preferences, GP home visits, and relatives to be given time off work.

Length of publication: 14 pages

 


Dying at home: A qualitative study of the perspectives of older South Asians living in the United Kingdom

February 10, 2014

Source: Palliative Medicine 2014 v.28(3), p.264-272

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Date of publication: March 2014

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell: This article aims to explore beliefs, attitudes and expectations expressed by older South Asians living in East London about dying at home. Findings suggest that older people of South Asian ethnicity living in East London perceive home as more than a physical location for dying relatives. They make efforts to adhere, and also adapt, to important social and cultural values relating to death and dying as part of the wider challenge of living in an emigrant society.

Length of publication: 8 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 


A ‘good death’ at home: community nurses helping to make it possible

February 1, 2013

Source: British Journal of Community Nursing, v.18(1),  pp40 – 42

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Date of publication: January 2013

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell: This article discusses current end of life policies and how the community nurse is central to their implementation. It draws on some recent research which has identified the important steps that enable a community nurse to facilitate a good death and a particular research study which illustrated the unique role of the Community Nurse in providing end of life care in a rural setting, but also the challenges.

Length of publication: 3 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

Acknowledgement: Internurse


More people able to die at home due to community specialist palliative care

August 24, 2012

Source: National Council for Palliative Care

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Date of publication: August 2012

Publication type: Report

In a nutshell: Specialist palliative care community services are leading to more people being able to die at home, according to a major new report out today by the National Council for Palliative Care and the National End of Life Care Intelligence Network. Latest figures show that a third of those receiving specialist palliative care in 2010/11 died at home, compared with just one in five nationally. This is the third successive year that the proportion of deaths at home has increased for people using community specialist palliative care services.

Length of publication: 88p.

Acknowledgement: National Council for Palliative Care; National End of Life Care Intelligence Network; National End of Life Care Programme


What do we know now that we didn’t know a year ago? New intelligence on end of life care in England

May 23, 2012

Source: National End of Life Care Programme

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Date of publication:  May 2012

Publication type:  Report

In a nutshell: This report highlights the progress made in the implementation of the Department of Health’s End of Life Care Strategy and identifies the successes of the programme as well as those areas that need improvement. The report consists of 16 categories including:

  • place of care and death
  • latest trends in different settings
  • disease types
  • costs
  • quality of care
  • workforce and public attitudes

Examples of areas for improvement highlighted by the report include unplanned emergency care and advance care planning with a view to improve the experience of patients and their families but also to deliver more cost-effective care.

Length of publication: 28 pages


End-of-life preferences in advanced cancer patients willing to discuss issues surrounding their terminal condition

April 24, 2012

Source: European Journal of Cancer Care

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Date of publication: April 2012

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell: The aim of the study is to describe end-of-life preferences of advanced cancer patients willing to talk about death issues. Eighty-eight advanced cancer patients were interviewed through End of Life Preferences Interview (ELPI), a 23-item interview covering a wide range of end-of-life care issues. Most interviewed subjects were home care patients. The article concludes that ELPI can be a useful instrument to adapt the model of care to the specific needs and values of each patient.

Some important notes: This article is only available online at present. For assistance in obtaining a copy of this article, please contact your local NHS Library. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.