“It’s alright to ask for help”: findings from a qualitative study exploring the information and support needs of family carers at the end of life

May 2, 2014

Source: BMC Palliative Care 2014, 13:22

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Date of publication: April 2014

Publication type: Research article

In a nutshell: Family carers play an essential role in providing end-of-life care to their relatives but have been found to experience uncertainty and a lack of confidence in fulfilling their caregiving roles, prompting recent calls for educational or information based resources to be developed for carers. The authors carried out four focus groups with Clinical Nurse Specialists, healthcare assistants, former and current carers at a hospice in the UK, to explore the information and support needs of family carers. The results suggest  three domains which could underpin this type of intervention: developing knowledge and competence; facilitating preparedness; supporting role recognition and confidence building. It is recommended that an integrated information giving approach which addresses these domains by combining a resource pack for carers with a more explicit acknowledging role for health professionals. Together these could provide key information and also build confidence amongst family carers to ask for further support and advice as needed.

Length of publication: 10 pages

 

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Understanding the role of the volunteer in specialist palliative care: a systematic review and thematic synthesis of qualitative studies

February 7, 2014

Source: BMC Palliative Care 2014 v.13(3)

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Date of publication: February 2014

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell: This research article is a systematic review of qualitative studies looking at the major contribution volunteers make to palliative patient care. The authors sought to uncover how the role of volunteers with direct contact with patients in specialist palliative care is understood by volunteers, patients, families and staff.

Length of publication: 22p.

 


Do models of care designed for terminally ill ‘home alone’ people improve their end-of-life experience? A patient perspective

March 28, 2013

Source: Health & Social Care in the Community v.20(6) p599-606

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Date of publication: November 2012

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell: Palliative care patients who live alone report greater psychological distress, and are less likely to die at home than those living with a family carer. However, there is a lack of research on the value of models of care that specifically address this disadvantage. This article describes the experiences of terminally ill ‘home alone’ people using one of two models of care aimed at maintaining participants’ need for independent living, focusing on the effect of these two models of care on their physical, social and emotional needs.

Length of publication: 7 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 


Introducing an electronic Palliative Care Summary (ePCS) in Scotland: patient, carer and professional perspectives

February 27, 2013

Source: Family Practice

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Date of publication: October 2012

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell: An electronic Palliative Care Summary (ePCS) is currently being implemented throughout Scotland to provide out-of-hours (OOH) staff with up-to-date summaries of medical history, patient understanding and wishes, medications and decisions regarding treatment of patients requiring palliative care: automatic twice daily updates of information from GP records to a central electronic repository are available to OOH services. The article concludes that the ePCS has clear potential to improve patient care although several implementation issues and technical problems require to be addressed first to enable this.

Length of publication: 10 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

Acknowledgement: Medline


Barriers and facilitators to the receipt of palliative care for people with dementia: The views of medical and nursing staff

September 24, 2012

Source: Palliative Medicine 2012, 26(7) p.879-886

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Date of publication: October 2012

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell:  This paper reports on qualitative research conducted in the UK that sought to explore the experiences of health care practitioners working in palliative care and sought to establish the issues relating to end-of-life care for people with dementia. Four themes were identified: Making the transition; Competence challenged; ‘The long view’ and Working together. The paper concludes with recommendations for policy and practice development.

Length of publication: 8 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 


Transitions to palliative care in acute hospitals in England: qualitative study

April 26, 2011

Source: BMJ  2011; 342:d1773

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Date: March 2011

Publication Type: Article

Publication Length:7 pages

In a nutshell: This qualitative study explores how transitions to a palliative care approach are perceived to be managed in acute hospital settings in England. The article concludes that significant barriers to implementing a policy of structured transitions to palliative care in acute hospitals were identified by health professionals in both primary and secondary care. These need to be addressed if current UK policy on management of palliative care in acute hospitals is to be established.


Key stakeholders’ experiences and views of the NHS End of Life Care Programme: findings from a national evaluation

May 26, 2009

Title: Key stakeholders’ experiences and views of the NHS End of Life Care Programme: findings from a national evaluation

Author: Kennedy, S. et al

Source: Palliative Medicine Vol. 23 No. 4 p283-294

In a nutshell: This article reports on the qualitative interview component of a national evaluation of the NHS End of Life Care Programme. It describes and discusses the views and experiences of 37 stakeholders of the Programme in relation to its development and implementation, impact and sustainability.

Notes: Contact your local health Library for assistance in obtaining this article