Identifying palliative care champions to promote high‐quality care to those with serious illness

June 17, 2019

SourceJournal of the American Geriatrics Society 2019; 67 (S2)

Follow this link for fulltext

Date of publicationMay 2019

Publication typeJournal Article

In a nutshellThis article looks at the workforce shortage in palliative care services and introduces the idea of “Palliative Care Champions.”

Length of publication: 7 pages


End of Life Care: Fifth report of Session 2014-15

April 10, 2015

Source: House of Commons Health Committee

Follow this link for the full report

Date of publication: March 2015

Publication type: Parliamentary report

In a nutshell: This report looks at the state of End of Life Care since the Independent Review of the Liverpool Care Pathway. This report makes a number of recommendations for improvement.

Length of publication: 54p.

 


Living and dying with dementia in England: Barriers to care

December 11, 2014

Source: Marie Curie Cancer Care and Alzheimer’s Society

Follow this link for the report

Date of publication: December 2014

Publication type: Report

In a nutshell: A new report from Marie Curie and Alzheimer’s Society today reveals the barriers that prevent people with dementia from accessing high-quality care at the end of life in England

Living and Dying with Dementia – Barriers to Care addresses the often overlooked final stage of dementia – a progressive, terminal illness. It highlights that dementia is often not recognised as a terminal diagnosis, which can lead to poor access to care, inconsistent quality of care and inadequate pain management.

Length of publication: 24p.

 


National Survey of Bereaved People (VOICES), 2013

July 10, 2014

Source: Office for National Statistics

Follow this link to download the report

Date of publication: July 2014

Publication type: Statistical Report

In a nutshell: Key findings from the 2013 National Survey of Bereaved People suggest:

  • Overall quality of care has not changed significantly between 2011, 2012 and 2013.
  • Quality of care was rated significantly lower for people who died in a hospital, compared to people dying at home, in a hospice or care home.
  • For those dying at home, the quality of coordination of care was rated significantly lower in 2013 compared to 2012.
  • The dignity and respect for patients shown by hospital nurses and hospice nurses has increased between 2011 and 2013.
  • Pain is relieved most effectively in the hospice setting (62%) and least effectively at home (18%).
  • Only one third of people (35%) who express a preference to die at home, actually die at home.

Length of publication: 24 pages

 


Transforming end of life care in acute hospitals

July 9, 2014

Source: NHS Improving Quality

Follow this link for the website

Date of publication: June 2014

Publication type: Website

In a nutshell: The Transform Programme aims to improve the quality of end of life care in hospitals across England, enabling more people to be supported to live and die well in their preferred place.

The programme encourages hospital Trusts to develop a strategic approach to reaching their aim to improve quality of care. This includes:

– The involvement of of patients, carers and the public

– Developing staff skills, competencies and confidence through education and development

– Quality assurance, measurement and evaluation

The Transform Programme aims to improve the quality of end of life care within acute hospitals across England, enabling more people to be supported to live and die well in their preferred place.

The programme focuses on both the quality of care provided by acute hospitals, as well as the important role acute hospitals have, as one of many organisations that may provide care for people who are approaching end of life. End of life care includes care for people in their last years, months and days of life as well as care after death.

– See more at: http://www.nhsiq.nhs.uk/improvement-programmes/long-term-conditions-and-integrated-care/end-of-life-care/acute-hospital-care.aspx#sthash.FdEV1IAF.dpuf

 

The Transform Programme aims to improve the quality of end of life care within acute hospitals across England, enabling more people to be supported to live and die well in their preferred place.

The programme focuses on both the quality of care provided by acute hospitals, as well as the important role acute hospitals have, as one of many organisations that may provide care for people who are approaching end of life. End of life care includes care for people in their last years, months and days of life as well as care after death.

– See more at: http://www.nhsiq.nhs.uk/improvement-programmes/long-term-conditions-and-integrated-care/end-of-life-care/acute-hospital-care.aspx#sthash.FdEV1IAF.dpuf

 

The Transform Programme aims to improve the quality of end of life care within acute hospitals across England, enabling more people to be supported to live and die well in their preferred place.

The programme focuses on both the quality of care provided by acute hospitals, as well as the important role acute hospitals have, as one of many organisations that may provide care for people who are approaching end of life. End of life care includes care for people in their last years, months and days of life as well as care after death.

– See more at: http://www.nhsiq.nhs.uk/improvement-programmes/long-term-conditions-and-integrated-care/end-of-life-care/acute-hospital-care.aspx#sthash.FdEV1IAF.dpu

The Transform Programme aims to improve the quality of end of life care within acute hospitals across England, enabling more people to be supported to live and die well in their preferred place.

The programme focuses on both the quality of care provided by acute hospitals, as well as the important role acute hospitals have, as one of many organisations that may provide care for people who are approaching end of life. End of life care includes care for people in their last years, months and days of life as well as care after death.

– See more at: http://www.nhsiq.nhs.uk/improvement-programmes/long-term-conditions-and-integrated-care/end-of-life-care/acute-hospital-care.aspx#sthash.FdEV1IAF.dpuf

 


An Evaluation of End of Life Care Facilitator Networks A Report for the National End of Life Care Programme

June 4, 2013

Source: NHS Improving Quality

Follow this link to download the report

Date of publication: April 2013

Publication type: Report

In a nutshell: In 2010, the National End of Life Care Programme (NEoLCP) set up a network for End of Life Care (EoLC) facilitators to promote sharing of information, expertise, experience, best practice, and to provide peer support. In 2013 an independent evaluation of EoLC facilitators’ networks was undertaken by researchers at the University of York to test the benefits and value of the networks from the perspective of EoLC facilitators. This report shares best practice and demonstrates the enthusiastic, skilled and motivated network of EoLC facilitators now in place has made a significant contribution to improving the quality of care people receive at the end of life. Working with colleagues across a range of disciplines, EoLC facilitators have been the catalyst for service improvement in many areas of EoLC.

Length of publication: 44 pages


ONS report shows wide variety in quality of care given in the last three months of life across England

December 21, 2012
Source: Office for National Statistics

Follow this link for the full-text report

Date of publication: November 2012

Publication type: Report

In a nutshell: Wide variations in the quality of end of life care across the country were revealed in a report published  by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). The first national VOICES survey asked recently bereaved people about the quality of care received by their loved ones in their last three months of life. Full statistical findings were published in July 2012. This report breaks down findings from the survey by Primary Care Trust (PCT) clusters. Results showed how:

  • PCT Clusters in the South West were regularly rated in the top 20 per cent across all areas of care. Bournemouth and Poole and Dorset PCT Cluster was rated particularly highly.
  • The North East and North West of the country were rated highly, particularly for quality of care, dignity and respect and patient care and support. The North of Tyne PCT Cluster scored highly across all areas.
  • The poorest ratings were given to London PCT Clusters, which were featured regularly in the bottom 20 per cent.

Length of publication: 12p.

Acknowledgement: National End of Life Care Programme