Successful launch of North Manchester Macmillan Palliative Care Support Service

November 4, 2015

Source: Pennine Acute Hospitals NHS Trust

Follow this link for the fulltext press-release

Date of publication: October 2015

Publication type: Press release

In a nutshell: The North Manchester Macmillan Palliative Care Support Service (NMMPCSS) was launched September 21 2015. The £560k service is part of the Macmillan Cancer Improvement Partnership (MCIP) and has been developed through a partnership between Macmillan Cancer Support, the Manchester Clinical Commissioning Groups, The Pennine Acute Hospitals Trust, and St Ann’s Hospice. The service provides

  • Round-the-clock telephone advice, as well as visits and care in the home;
  • Dedicated professionals working together with patients and carers – seven days a week from 8am to 8pm
  • An open referral system for patients, carers and professionals. (Patients can refer themselves to the service)
  • Help with managing problems such as pain, sickness, breathlessness, and psychological and emotional support
  • Ways for people to talk about what is important to them in their care
  • Extra help at home when things are difficult, bringing support to carers

 


End of life care improving according to report

July 10, 2015

Source: Public Health England

Follow this link for the press release

Date of publication: June 26th

Publication type: Press release

In a nutshell: The ‘What We Know Now 2014’ report suggests a growing understanding within the health sector of what is important to people at the end of life. The report finds that home continues to be the preferred place of death for people in England, followed by hospices and care homes. The proportion of people dying at home or in care homes has increased from 35% (166,749) in 2004 to 44% (207,764) in 2013. The number of people dying in hospitals has dropped by 50,000 since 2004. In 2013, this was less than half of all deaths (227,748).

The factors most important to people at the end of their life are having pain and other symptoms managed effectively, being surrounded by loved ones and being treated with dignity.

 


Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of home palliative care services for adults with advanced illness and their caregivers

August 9, 2013

Source:  The Cochrane Library

Follow this link to download the review

Date of publication: June 2013

Publication type: Systematic Review

In a nutshell: A new review from the Cochrane Pain, Palliative and Supportive Care Group looked at the impact of home palliative care services on the chances of dying at home and on other outcomes for patients and their caregivers, such as symptom control and quality of life. The review team also aimed to compare resource use and costs associated with these services and summarize the current evidence on cost-effectiveness.

Length of publication: 281 pages


Reduction in symptoms for homebound patients receiving Home-based Primary and Palliative Care

July 1, 2013

Source: Journal of Palliative Medicine

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: Online ahead of print: 8 June 2013

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell: The purpose of this study was to determine whether high symptom burden decreases following Home-Based Primary and Palliative Care (HBPC) enrollment. The article concludes that in a chronically ill population of urban home-bound, patient symptoms can be successfully managed in the home. The authors recommend future work should continue to explore symptom assessment and management over time for the chronically ill home-bound.

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 


Palliative Care 1: principles of palliative care nursing and end of life care

April 28, 2009

Title: Palliative Care 1: principles of palliative care nursing and end of life care

Author: Robert Becker

Source: Nursing Times 2009 Vol.105 No.13 pgs 14-16

In a nutshell: The first in a three part series examining the diversity and challenges inherent in nurses’ contribution to palliative care. The art and science of caring for the dying and their families has long been recognised as an immensely demanding and rewarding part of health and social care. For nurses, it is central to the values and principles that underpin clinical practice.

Contact the library for a copy of this article


Palliative Care 3: Using palliative nursing skills in clinical practice

April 28, 2009

Title: Palliative Care 3: Using palliative nursing skills in practice

Author: Robert Becker

Source: Nursing Times Vol. 105 No. 15 p18-21

Year of Publication: 2009

In a nutshell: This article explores the practice-based reality of using the palliative approach in multiple settings and the challenges in such care.

Acknowledgements: Nursing Times

Contact your health library for a copy of this article


Annual Evidence Update 9 February 2009: Gastrointestinal symptoms in supportive and palliative care

February 27, 2009

Title: Annual Evidence Update 9 February 2009: Gastrointestinal symptoms in supportive and palliative care

Source: NLH: Supportive and Palliative Care Specialist Library

For fulltext link here

Year of publication: 2009

Publication type: Website

In a nutshell: This update collects together the best current knowledge on the supportive care management of these conditions, concentrating on systematic reviews as well as high quality reviews and randomised controlled trials within the scope of supportive and palliative care. It also includes some expert-led consensus statements and guidelines, as although they may not meet the definition of ‘systematic review’, they may be more immediately applicable in a clinical situation and they do contain detailed references.