The lived experiences of the Sikh population of south east England when caring for a dying relative at home

June 9, 2014

Source: International Journal of Palliative Nursing  v.20(4), p179-86

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: April 2014

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell:  This project aimed to explore and understand the experiences of the Sikh population of south east England when caring for a dying relative at home without support from Specialist Palliative Care (SPC). The results reports that five super-ordinate themes were identified: factors leading to the caring role, emotional effects of caring on the carer, impact of caring on the wider family, influence of health-care services, and religious and cultural influence. The most common emergent theme was lack of support from health professionals, which emerged from a lack of awareness of services. The article concludes that there is a need for health professionals to reach out to this population to increase awareness of and trust in the services that are available to support care at the end of life. However, an unwillingness to accept assistance may persist in some cases.

Length of publication: 8 pages

Some important notes: This article is available in full text to all NHS Staff using Athens, for more information about accessing full text follow this link to find your local NHS Library

 


Putting a principle of palliative care into the community

December 27, 2013

Source: British Journal of Community Nursing 2013 Vol. 18 (12), pp 622

Follow this link for the abstract

Date of publication: Article

Publication type: December 2013

In a nutshell: This article discusses the World Health Organization (WHO) principle,

“Palliative care should offer a support system to help the family cope during the patient’s illness and in their own bereavement”

This principle supports families however it’s implementation poses challenges for both community nurses and palliative care professionals. Hospitals too, have neither the space nor the staff to accommodate patients’ families and friends during the terminal phase. The author argues that however difficult it is to implement this principle, that the benefit for caring for the family are greater in terms of patient well-being and quality of life remaining.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Hospital receives international recognition for palliative care training

December 27, 2013

Source: Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust

Follow this link for the website

Date of publication: December 2013

Publication type: News article

In a nutshell: Good Hope Hospital has received international acclaim for its innovative training for staff providing end of life care to patients.  Consultant in Palliative Care, Dr Lisa Boulstridge, and the simulation centre team have worked together over the last four years to develop training which uses sophisticated mannequin technology to create life-like scenarios for clinical staff to react to. This enables teams and individuals to develop and test their clinical skills in a safe and fully supported learning environment. Since its launch, the training has been taken up by hospital doctors and nurses; GP trainees and specialist palliative care teams working in hospices and community settings.

Length of publication:  1 page


Improving the quality of palliative and terminal care in the hospital by a network of palliative care nurse champions: the study protocol of the PalTeC-H project.

July 31, 2013

Source: BMC Health Services Research

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Date of publication: March 2013

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell:  This article describes the protocol of a study to assess the quality of care of the dying patient and the contribution of an intervention targeted on staff nurses of inpatient wards of a large university hospital in the Netherlands. Assessments are performed among bereaved relatives, nurses and physicians on seven wards before and after introduction ofthe intervention and on 11 control wards where the intervention is not applied. The researchers focused on care provided during the last three days of life, covered in global ratings of the quality of life in the last three days of life and the quality of dying, and various secondary endpoints of treatment and care affecting quality of life and dying. The authors aim to improve the understanding of and attention for patients, needs, and the quality of care in the dying phase in the hospital and measure the impact of a quality improvement intervention targeted at nurses.

Length of publication: 7 pages


Transitions between care settings after enrolment in a palliative care service in Italy: a retrospective analysis.

May 7, 2013

Source: International Journal of Palliative Nursing 2013 v.19(3), p110-5

Follow this link for the full-text article

Date of publication: March 2013

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell: This study was a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data that aimed to map patients’ care transitions following admission to a specialist palliative care service in Italy called Antea Centre. External transitions were defined as a change in the setting of care, with the patient no longer being cared for by Antea staff. Internal transitions were defined as a change in the setting of care, with the care still being provided by Antea staff. A total of I 123 patients out of 5313 admitted to the palliative service (21%) experienced transitions. Patients who experienced no transitions after their admission to the palliative care service were more likely to have a Karnofsky Performance Scale Index ≤30, to have been referred by a hospital physician, to have a shorter survival time, and to have home as their place of death (P<0.001). The article concluded that, although the patients with no transitions had worse clinical conditions, organisations should pay attention to reducing the possible negative effects of transitions, such as discontinuity of care and poor coordination.

Length of publication: 6 pages

Some important notes: This article is available in full text to all NHS Staff using Athens, for more information about accessing full text follow this link to find your local NHS Library

 


In-Home Palliative Care Allows More Patients to Die at Home, Leading to Higher Satisfaction and Lower Acute Care Utilization and Costs

October 24, 2012

Source: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

Follow this link for report abstract

Date of publication: April 2012 (updated)

Publication type: Report

In a nutshell: Kaiser Permanente developed a home-based model of palliative care that uses an interdisciplinary team of providers to manage symptoms and pain, provide emotional and spiritual support, and educate patients and family members on an ongoing basis about changes in the patient’s condition. One randomized controlled trial and one comparison-group study showed that the program increases patient satisfaction, increases the portion of patients dying at home rather than in the hospital, and reduces emergency department visits, inpatient admissions, and costs.

Some important notes: The related Quality Tool can be found by following this link – The TriCentral Palliative Care (TCPC) Program Toolkit


Development of an end-of-life care pathway for patients with advanced heart failure in a community setting

October 3, 2012

Source: International Journal of Palliative Nursing 2012 18(6) p295-300

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Date of publication: June 2012

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell: Through clinical audit a community heart failure nurse identified that the palliative care needs of patients with advanced heart failure were not being adequately addressed in his locality. A more cohesive way of managing these patients was required. Joint working between heart failure and palliative care clinicians as well as the development of an advanced heart failure shared care pathway and supporting tools resulted in patients with heart failure having improved access to palliative care, more of these patients dying in their preferred place of care, and the provision of a holistic heart failure service spanning referral to end of life. The impact of chronic heart failure on both individual patients and the NHS is considerable. With interdisciplinary and interorganisational collaboration, a new approach to managing patients with heart failure has been developed that has resulted in improved patient care.

Length of publication: 6 pages

Some important notes: This article is available in full text to all NHS Staff using Athens, for more information about accessing full text follow this link to find your local NHS Library