End of Life Care Horizon Scanning Bulletin Volume 9 Issue 3

April 5, 2018
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Together for Short Lives launches strategy to improve children’s palliative care

April 5, 2018

Source: Together for Short Lives

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Date of publication: March 2018

Publication type: Strategy

In a nutshell:  Together for Short Lives has set out a  five-year strategy, to work with its members and partners, to improve children’s palliative across the UK. The new strategy for 2018-2023, called “Together for the 49,000+”, focuses on achieving positive change for babies, children and young people with life-limiting conditions, their families, and those that support them.

Length of publication: 18 pages


Who cares for the carers at hospital discharge at the end of life? A qualitative study of current practice in discharge planning and the potential value of using The Carer Support Needs Assessment Tool (CSNAT) Approach

April 5, 2018

Source: Palliative Medicine  2018 Feb 28. [Epub ahead of print]

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Date of publication: February 2018

Publication type: Journal Article

In a nutshell: This study identifies a novel intervention, which expands the focus of discharge planning to include assessment of carers’ support needs at transition, potentially preventing breakdown of care at home and patient readmissions to hospital.

Length of publication: 11 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article.  Follow this link to find your local NHS Library


Palliative care for people with schizophrenia: a qualitative study of an under-serviced group in need

April 5, 2018

Source: BMC Palliative Care  2018; 17:53

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Date of publication: March 2018

Publication type: Journal Article

In a nutshell: People with schizophrenia are at risk of receiving poorer end of life care than other patients. They are often undertreated, avoid treatment and are about half as likely to access palliative care. There are limited options for end of life care for this under-serviced group in need. To ensure people with schizophrenia are well supported at the end of life a model of palliative care is required that offers both specialised services and capacity building within the pre-existing health workforce. Resources are needed to address the stigma and lack of services faced by this vulnerable group.

Length of publication: 11 pages

 


Emergency admissions at end of life set to sky rocket

April 5, 2018

Source: Marie Curie

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Date of publication: March 2018

Publication type: News Item

In a nutshell: Marie Curie says that the NHS is struggling to cope with A&E admissions of people who are in the last year of their lives. The charity says the situation will hit crisis point if care provided in the community is not significantly improved.  They warn that the significant rise in the number of deaths over the next 20 years means the cost of emergency admissions for people in the last year of life could almost double – costing the NHS an extra £2 billion, and up to 8,000 extra hospital beds could be needed by 2038 – the equivalent of an extra ward in every hospital with a major A&E unit.

Length of publication: 1 page

 


Why we need more poetry in palliative care

April 5, 2018

Source: BMJ Supportive and Palliative Care  2018 Mar 23 [Epub ahead of print]

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Date of publication: March 2018

Publication type: Journal Article

In a nutshell: Poetry is one way in which many people, including patients and palliative care professionals, may seek meaning from and make sense of serious illnesses and losses towards the end of life. It may have untapped potential for developing person-centred organisations, training health professionals, supporting patients and for promoting public engagement in palliative care.

Length of publication: 6 pages

 


Cicely Saunders Institute produces videos on improving palliative care

April 5, 2018

Source: ehospice

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Date of publication: March 2018

Publication type: News Item

In a nutshell: The Cicely Saunders Institute has created a series of videos about their current research project looking at improving palliative healthcare.  Titled C-CHANGE, the project is assessing how to improve patient and carer palliative healthcare by better understanding their needs and complexities.  The videos cover how to support patients’ needs, how C-CHANGE will respond to patients in distress, and the carer’s experience.

Length of publication: 1 page

Some important notes:  The videos can be viewed on You Tube