Supporting carers to manage pain medication in cancer patients at the end of life: A feasibility trial

August 29, 2017

Source: Palliative Medicine

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Date of publication: July 2017

Publication type: Journal Article

In a nutshell: This article discusses a nurse-led intervention to help carers with medication management, and evaluated its use in routine practice.  The Cancer Carers’ Medicines Management (CCMM) intervention addresses carers’ beliefs, knowledge and skills and promotes self-evaluation of competence. It centres on a structured conversational process between a nurse and carer.  The research showed that the CCMM intervention compared favourably with current practice as it offered a more systematic and comprehensive approach to supporting carer management of pain medicines.

Length of publication: 11 pages

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Successful launch of North Manchester Macmillan Palliative Care Support Service

November 4, 2015

Source: Pennine Acute Hospitals NHS Trust

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Date of publication: October 2015

Publication type: Press release

In a nutshell: The North Manchester Macmillan Palliative Care Support Service (NMMPCSS) was launched September 21 2015. The £560k service is part of the Macmillan Cancer Improvement Partnership (MCIP) and has been developed through a partnership between Macmillan Cancer Support, the Manchester Clinical Commissioning Groups, The Pennine Acute Hospitals Trust, and St Ann’s Hospice. The service provides

  • Round-the-clock telephone advice, as well as visits and care in the home;
  • Dedicated professionals working together with patients and carers – seven days a week from 8am to 8pm
  • An open referral system for patients, carers and professionals. (Patients can refer themselves to the service)
  • Help with managing problems such as pain, sickness, breathlessness, and psychological and emotional support
  • Ways for people to talk about what is important to them in their care
  • Extra help at home when things are difficult, bringing support to carers

 


Is dying in hospital better than home in incurable cancer and what factors influence this? A population-based study

October 9, 2015

Source: BMC Medicine 2015, 13:235

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Date of publication: October 2015

Publication type: Article

In a nutshell: This study aims to determine the association between place of death, health services used, and pain, feeling at peace, and grief intensity.  The authors determined factors influencing death at home, and associations between place of death and pain, peace, and grief. Findings suggest that dying at home is better than hospital for peace and grief, but requires a discussion of preferences, GP home visits, and relatives to be given time off work.

Length of publication: 14 pages

 


Glasgow and Lothian Partnership Case Study: Getting people home with the support they need

October 7, 2015

Source: Marie Curie

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Date of publication: September 2015

Publication type: Case Study

In a nutshell: The Marie Curie Fast-track Service offers short day and evening visits at home to provide health and personal care to people living with a terminal illness in Glasgow and Lothian. The service is for people nearing the end of their lives who are at risk of admission as well as those in hospital needing more care before discharge.

Length of publication: 2 pages

 


Fife Partnership Case Study: Tailored care and support for people at home

October 7, 2015

Source: Marie Curie

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Date of publication: September 2015

Publication type: Case Study

In a nutshell: The Marie Curie Fife Service provides tailored palliative care and support at home for people living with a terminal illness and their families. This is made possible by working with NHS Fife and Fife Council, as well as voluntary and private organisations. Working with local services, GPs and district nurses, the Marie Curie Fife Service offers tailored care to people with any terminal illness. This includes nursing care at home, personal care after discharge from hospital, emotional support and practical information. The service can prevent crisis hospital admissions and help those in hospital be discharged more quickly.

Length of publication: 2 pages

 


Increasing the number of people from a Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) background accessing palliative care services

September 3, 2015

Source: NHS Improving Quality

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Date of publication: August 2015

Publication type: Case study

In a nutshell: In September 2012, Marie Curie employed a keyworker at its Cardiff and the Vale hospice to work with people in local Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic communities to improve awareness of palliative care and to increase access.

Length of publication: 3 pages

 


End of life care improving according to report

July 10, 2015

Source: Public Health England

Follow this link for the press release

Date of publication: June 26th

Publication type: Press release

In a nutshell: The ‘What We Know Now 2014’ report suggests a growing understanding within the health sector of what is important to people at the end of life. The report finds that home continues to be the preferred place of death for people in England, followed by hospices and care homes. The proportion of people dying at home or in care homes has increased from 35% (166,749) in 2004 to 44% (207,764) in 2013. The number of people dying in hospitals has dropped by 50,000 since 2004. In 2013, this was less than half of all deaths (227,748).

The factors most important to people at the end of their life are having pain and other symptoms managed effectively, being surrounded by loved ones and being treated with dignity.